Wednesday , November 13 2019
Home / Headline / Hong Kong protesters form human chain in call for democracy

Hong Kong protesters form human chain in call for democracy

World·Photos

Supporters of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement lined city streets and part of the city’s harbourfront Friday, inspired by a similar protest in the Baltic states 30 years ago against Soviet control.

Demonstration inspired by protest in Baltic states against Soviet Union 30 years ago

Demonstrators link hands as they gather along a street in Hong Kong, a recreation of the pro-democracy ‘Baltic Way’ protest against Soviet rule three decades ago, on Friday.(Kin Cheung/Associated Press)

 

Supporters of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement lined city streets and part of the city’s harbourfront Friday, inspired by a human chain in a historic Baltic states protest against Soviet control 30 years ago.

Some raised linked hands while others switched on their smartphone lights and held the devices aloft to create a row of white lights against the nighttime skyline. Organizers hoped the chains, which traced three subway routes, would total 40 kilometres in length.

 

Some raised linked hands while others switched on their smartphone lights and held the devices aloft to create a row of white lights against the nighttime skyline.(Thomas Peter/Reuters)

 

It was the latest protest in a nearly 11-week-old movement that began with calls to scrap a now-suspended extradition bill and has widened to include demands for full democracy and an independent inquiry into alleged police brutality at protests.

“It actually enraged me, the way that the government, the [city’s] chief executive and then the police, how they carry out their jobs,” said Michael Ng who works in finance and joined the chain outside an upscale mall. “Very brutal, I would say. We are talking about human rights here.”

Police say their use of tear gas, rubber bullets and bean bag rounds has been necessary to clear streets of protesters who have pelted them with eggs, bricks and gasoline bombs.

 

Organizers hoped the human chains, which traced three subway routes, would total 40 kilometres in length.(Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)

 

In a protest dubbed “the Baltic Way,” nearly two million Latvians, Lithuanians and Estonians formed a human chain more than 600 kilometres long on Aug. 23, 1989.

Organizers of “the Hong Kong Way” said it would be a show of solidarity against the extradition law and police violence, as well as a plea for international support.

 

Organizers of ‘the Hong Kong Way’ said it would be a show of solidarity against the extradition law and police violence, as well as a plea for international support.(Vincent Yu/Associated Press)

 

“I joined the Hong Kong Way because it’s peaceful,” said protester Peter Cheung, 27. “This is the 30th anniversary of the Baltic Way. I hope there will be a bigger chance to make an international noise.”

The protest, which included dozens shining lights from the top of Kowloon’s Lion Rock, visible from the main island of Hong Kong, showed the apparent defiance of Hong Kong people after warnings from Communist Party leaders in Beijing and Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam about violence.

 

People light up laser beams and mobile phones atop Hong Kong’s Lion Rock.(Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Police presence was thin and the protest ended promptly at 9 p.m. local time.

In Lithuania, people marked the 30th anniversary of the Baltic Way by recreating the chain, and some in the crowd carried Hong Kong and Tibetan flags.

 

People take part in a similar protest in support of the Hong Kong Way, in Vilnius, Lithuania, on Friday.(Petras Malukas/AFP/Getty Images)

 

“The Baltic Way was occupied people showing their oppressor that they are no longer afraid and that they will be free,” attendee Ramunas Terleckas told Reuters. “I think this is what inspires Hong Kong to fight for their rights and freedom in this way.”

Lithuania’s President Gitanas Nauseda, who was marking the anniversary with his Latvian counterpart at another event on their shared border, added: “The welfare, peace and prosperity of Hong Kong’s people is a goal we all share.”

 

With files from Reuters

Credit belongs to : www.cbc.ca

index.php

Apple, Google not doing enough to fight app-store malware, say security experts

Nova Scotia Companies like Apple and Google need to do more to protect malware from …