Home / US & World / Storm recovery begins in Atlantic Canada as police confirm Fiona’s 1st fatality

Storm recovery begins in Atlantic Canada as police confirm Fiona’s 1st fatality

People across Atlantic Canada are beginning to assess the damage and clean up after post-tropical storm Fiona swept through the region Friday and Saturday.

Homes, businesses destroyed and hundreds of thousands are still without power

People across Atlantic Canada are beginning to assess the damage and clean up after post-tropical storm Fiona swept through the region Saturday.

As of 9 a.m., remnants of Fiona are over southeastern Labrador and have merged with a trough — a long region of low atmospheric pressure.

Fiona spent early Sunday morning moving inland in southeastern Quebec as a post-tropical storm, according to Environment Canada. It's expected to dissipate over the Labrador Sea.

The agency said winds were at 80 km/h and all wind warnings associated with the storm have ended.

In Newfoundland, some homes were washed away or flattened, others were flooded, roads were washed out and people were evacuated. The damage was most striking in Port aux Basques, where boulders and debris were scattered across the community.

On Sunday morning, CBC meteorologist Ashley Brauweiler said while the winds in Port aux Basques were significant, the bulk of the damage was caused by storm surge.

In Nova Scotia, hundreds of thousand of people were without power on Sunday, and the Canadian Armed Forces has been called in to help restore electricity. Two municipalities in Cape Breton declared a state of emergency. The fastest winds clocked in at 171 km/h in Arisaig, just north of Antigonish.

The devastation of a day: Scenes of Fiona's damage across Atlantic Canada

5 hours ago

Duration 3:05

Within hours, post-tropical storm Fiona caused destruction and upheaval in all four Atlantic provinces, as well as in eastern Quebec. See some of the impact as gathered by CBC News crews.

Ottawa has also approved Nova Scotia's request for funding for disaster assistance to help municipalities repair damaged infrastructure, and to assist individuals and small businesses pay for uninsured losses

On Prince Edward Island, winds hit 150 km/h and almost 100 millimetres of rain fell, homes and businesses were damaged and flooded, and at one point about 95 per cent of Maritime Electric customers had lost electricity.

Residents in Charlottetown are now being asked to stay off the roads and shelter in place after the storm rushed over the Island.

In New Brunswick, roads were flooded, a bridge was destroyed and tens of thousands were without electricity. Residents there are also being asked to stay away from dangerous, storm-ravaged areas.

Power outages are still widespread on Sunday morning, with more than 375,000 customers in the dark across the four Atlantic provinces, including nearly 272,000 in Nova Scotia.

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